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The Cannon Haymarket

Sixty Glorious Years 1928 - 1988

A Brochure produced by Cannon Cinemas to celebrate 60 years of the former Carlton Theatre

The Cannon, Haymarket during the run of the films 'Jumpin' Jack Flash, 'Stand by Me', and 'Flight of the Navigator' - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

Above - The Cannon, Haymarket during the run of the films 'Jumpin' Jack Flash, 'Stand by Me', and 'Flight of the Navigator' - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

'Sixty Glorious Years' a souvenir brochure for the Cannon Haymarket / Carlton Theatre 1928 to 1988.In 1988 Cannon Cinemas produced a brochure celebrating 60 years of the Cannon Haymarket, which was originally built as the Carlton Theatre in 1927. The brochure had a foreword by the then Managing Director of Cannon Cinemas, Barry C. Jenkins, and other articles, illustrated with many archive images of the building past and present, and was compiled by the Theatre's House Manager at the time, Mr. Lesley Tooze. I have transcribed the text from the brochure on this page, along with most of its accompanying images, as it is a wonderful record of this lovely old Theatre in London's Haymarket. Text follows:

Right - 'Sixty Glorious Years' a souvenir brochure for the Cannon Haymarket / Carlton Theatre 1928 to 1988.

Mr B.C. Jenkins, Managing Director of Cannon Cinemas in 1988.As the Managing Director of Cannon Cinemas Ltd., it gives me great pleasure to announce our celebration of the 60th anniversary of our flagship cinema, the Cannon Haymarket.

Left - Mr B.C. Jenkins, Managing Director of Cannon Cinemas in 1988.

I would like to thank all of our patrons for their continued support and generosity towards the David Pratt Trust.

We were rapidly becoming a major exhibitor at the time we acquired the Cannon Haymarket in 1979. Being a listed building and in an extremely desirable location, we realised its potential and soon decided to make it our flagship - a monument to our growth within the film industry. We spent an enormous amount of money on the beautiful foyer but this was practically destroyed by the fire which swept through the flagship in 1985. Because of the extent of the damage we were not sure whether we could restore the building to its former glory. However, after consulting experts and poring over old photographs and a vast amount of expenditure, we managed to retain most of its original elegance.

Fire Damage to the Foyer of the former Carlton Theatre in 1985 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

Above - Fire Damage to the Foyer of the former Carlton Theatre in 1985 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

The Foyer of the former Carlton Theatre after Restoration in 1987 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

Above - The Foyer of the former Carlton Theatre after Restoration in 1987 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

Mr B. C. Jenkins, Managing Director Cannon; Mr Y. Globus, and Mr M. Golan, Founders of Cannon welcome Her Majesty The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh to the Royal Charity Premiere of ORDEAL BY INNOCENCE at the Classic Haymarket on February 14th 1985.The Royal Family graced our flagship with their presence over the years, for various premieres - in 1980 Prince Charles attended the Premiere of BREAKER MORANT, in 1985 the Queen and Prince Philip attended ORDEAL BY INNOCENCE and Princess Anne attended the Premier of OLIVER TWIST in 1983 and the Premiere of ELENI in 1986.

Right - Mr B. C. Jenkins, Managing Director Cannon; Mr Y. Globus, and Mr M. Golan, Founders of Cannon welcome Her Majesty The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh to the Royal Charity Premiere of ORDEAL BY INNOCENCE at the Classic Haymarket on February 14th 1985.

No flagship could possible survive of course without the loyalty and dedication of its staff and I would like to voice my personal appreciation to the complete team working under the supervision of Mr. John Morley at the Cannon Haymarket.

CANNON continues to flourish and I am certain our flagship will give another sixty years of glorious entertainment.

BARRY C. JENKINS Managing Director.

The David Pratt Trust

The Carlton Theatre during the run of 'Valentino' with Eleanor Parker and Anthony Dexter in 1951 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988. The David Pratt Trust was founded by Cannon Managers when their previous Managing Director died suddenly in office in 1983, at a tragically early age.

It was intended as a permanent memorial to this 'Gentleman of Wardour Street' and his love of children, through the purchase of Sunshine Coaches in his name.

So far the Trust Fund has bought 6 Coaches, presented at Shaftesbury Avenue in London's West End; Taunton, Somerset; Hastings, Sussex; Crosby, Liverpool and Portsmouth in Hampshire.

The most recent coach will be presented at the Cannon Cinema in Northampton on 23rd September 1988.

Right - The Carlton Theatre during the run of 'Valentino' with Eleanor Parker and Anthony Dexter in 1951 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

The Trust is well on the way to Coach number seven, and all the proceeds from the sale of this brochure will be donated to the David Pratt Trust.

 Laurence Olivier's Presentation in Technicolour of Henry V by Wiliam Shakespeare which premiered at the Carlton in 1944 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

Above - Laurence Olivier's Presentation in Technicolour of Henry V by Wiliam Shakespeare which premiered at the Carlton in 1944 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

A programme for 'Lady Luck' which was the opening production at the Carlton Theatre in 1927 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988. To see another copy of this programme in detail click here.

Above - A programme for 'Lady Luck' which was the opening production at the Carlton Theatre in 1927 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988. To see another copy of this programme in detail click here.

As the patrons enter the Cannon Cinema Haymarket, they carry with them a hushed, almost reverential air. Not that they are overawed by the decor dominated by brass and plasterwork, but because such a foyer is a rare sight, even in the West End of London which has a long tradition of beautiful cinemas.

Maybe the fact that 63-65 Haymarket is a cinema at all is a surprise to them. It could easily be mistaken for the plush and opulent surroundings usually associated with a theatre. But they would not be far wrong. As recently as 1960, the building was host to live entertainment.

The original conception in the mid 1920's was for a venue suitable for the presentation of both live and film shows. Thus it was that the Carlton Theatre Company collaborated with Paramount in the construction of the Carlton Theatre, and in April 1927 the theatre opened with a stage production of 'Lady Luck'...

A programme for 'Good News' at the Carlton Theatre in 1927 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

Above - A programme for 'Good News' at the Carlton Theatre in 1927 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

Anglesea Yard, which was the site the Carlton Theatre was built on - From an image which graced the Safety Curtain at the Carlton Theatre in 1927 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988....However it was almost a year before use was made of the screen facilities on 26th March 1928, and it is this date that we have chosen to commemorate.

Left - Anglesea Yard, which was the site the Carlton Theatre was built on - From an image which graced the Safety Curtain at the Carlton Theatre in 1927 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

Designed by Frank Verity and S. Beverly, the theatre was built on Anglesea Yard, then shops and offices but originally a coaching station, and was only the second London theatre to be built after the war. The safety curtain reflected this original scene.

The Safety Curtain of the Carlton Theatre in a photograph taken in 1927 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988. The intention was for the Carlton to act as a sister cinema to the Plaza in Lower Regent Street (also run by Paramount) as indeed it did for twenty-five years.

The two cinemas, both having the same designers were very similar, from the shape of the auditoria and the projection boxes jutting out into the upper circle to identical light fittings.

However, following extensive modernisation of the Plaza, in 1988 it is almost impossible to find any resemblance.

Right - The Safety Curtain of the Carlton Theatre in a photograph taken in 1927 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

The Carlton had an advantage over the larger Plaza in the major stage facilities available.

The stage was 60ft wide and 45ft deep, with a proscenium opening of 42ft and a 75ft fly tower.

There were fourteen dressing rooms. These all enabled the Carlton to be host to five live productions in the 1920's.

On March 26th 1928 Paramount premiered its epic silent movie, WINGS, starring Richard Arlen, Clara Bow and Gary Cooper...

A programme of 'The Love Parade' at the Carlton Theatre in 1929 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

Above - A programme of 'The Love Parade' at the Carlton Theatre in 1929 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

...This ran exclusively for four months until live shows returned for a short time. When the Carlton was wired for sound in 1929 these live shows were discontinued and the emphasis was very much on film exhibition. The stage remained dark until 1960, when Anthony Newley supported the film LET'S GET MARRIED. The first sound film played at the Carlton was THE PERFECT ALIBI...

A programme for 'The Vagabond King' at the Carlton Theatre in 1930 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

Above - A programme for 'The Vagabond King' at the Carlton Theatre in 1930 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

Cecil B. de Mille's 'The Sign of the Cross' which was presented at the Carlton Theatre in 1932 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988. ...When war was declared the Carlton, along with all other cinemas, closed on 3rd September 1939, but unlike the others, did not reopen until 29th December 1939 when Paramount released their animated feature, GULLIVER'S TRAVELS.

The height of the Blitz saw reclosure in October 1940, and although many other cinemas remained closed during this period, the Carlton reopened a few weeks later on 25th November, despite a ban on evening performances. To overcome the loss of revenue caused by the shortened day, many cinemas brought their first performance forward to commence in the mid-morning.

Right - Cecil B. de Mille's 'The Sign of the Cross' which was presented at the Carlton Theatre in 1932 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

After the war, Paramount continued to run both the Carlton and the Plaza as showcases for their product, but in 1954 the Carlton was leased to Twentieth Century Fox to become their first West End operation.

Following the installation of Cinemascope, with a 'Miracle Mirror screen and stereophonic sound, on March 1st 1954 Fox premiered BENEATH THE TWELVE MILE REEF, and just a few years later bought the Carlton.

Harold Lloyd in his first 'All Talking Picture' 'Welcome Danger' at the Carlton Theatre in 1929 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988. Used as the main outlet for Fox releases in the West End, the Carlton prospered until the early 1970's, when it was allowed to fall into disrepair.

An advertisement for '3 Coins in the Fountain' presented in 'CinemaScope' at the Carlton Theatre in 1954 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988. In 1977 Fox drew up conversion plans to build another two screens for the second time (the first time such an idea was considered was in 1969), but then Fox made the decision to withdraw from film exhibition in Britain.

After the run of THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER on August 20th 1977 the Carlton was closed and it appeared that it would never reopen. The stage end of the building was sold to make way for an office block, and the cinema was left empty.

Left - Harold Lloyd in his first 'All Talking Picture' 'Welcome Danger' at the Carlton Theatre in 1929 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

Right - An advertisement for '3 Coins in the Fountain' presented in 'CinemaScope' at the Carlton Theatre in 1954 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

The final rescue was made by Classic, headed by Laurie Marsh.

Although the plans for the tripling went ahead, the character of the building remained, and on January 11th 1979, the Carlton made a spectacular return to West End entertainment renamed 'The Classic' and showing CAPRICORN ONE in each of its three new screens...

The Carlton Theatre during the run of 'A Yankee in King Arthurs Court' in 1948 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

Above - The Carlton Theatre during the run of 'A Yankee in King Arthurs Court' in 1948 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

An advertisement for Marlon Brando in 'Desiree' presented in 'CinemaScope' at the Carlton Theatre in 1954 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988. ...Due consideration had been taken of the history and layout of the building when the conversion plans had been drawn up. Cinema One retained much of the original ceiling and wall decoration - the auditorium was formed by extending the balcony and raising the screen - whilst Cinemas Two and Three were built side by side in the stalls area. No change was made to the foyer, except for relocation of the sales kiosk, and it is possible even now to see the magnificent frieze and original light fittings in Cinema One, as well as the beautiful Adam's style decoration in the foyer.

Left - An advertisement for Marlon Brando in 'Desiree' presented in 'CinemaScope' at the Carlton Theatre in 1954 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

The seating capacity was altered from 1,159 to 491, 201 and 222 respectively. A little later, following reseating this was reduced to 446 in Cinema One, and 200 in each of the smaller screens.

When Cannon Cinemas took over Classic, with a further name change to 'Cannon' Haymarket, this cinema remained, as it is today, the flagship of the company.

The Cannon Haymarket has been host to many previews and premieres, including those in the presence of Royalty, of which the most recent was ELENI, attended by Princess Anne, but perhaps the most notable being ORDEAL BY INNOCENCE which was shown in the presence of Her Majesty The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh.

The Carlton Theatre during the run of 'We Were Strangers' in 1949 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

Above - The Carlton Theatre during the run of 'We Were Strangers' in 1949 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

The Cannon, Haymarket in 1986 during the Royal Charity Premiere of 'Eleni' - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988. On July 25th 1985 disaster struck. Fire almost totally destroyed the foyer, and although the three auditoria suffered only smoke damage, it seemed as though the entire ceiling and much of the ornate decorations would be lost.

However, following hundreds of hours of work, Cannon have restored the foyer to all its former glory, right down to the gilded plasterwork and crystal chandeliers.

Right - The Cannon, Haymarket in 1986 during the Royal Charity Premiere of 'Eleni' - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

Having survived the past sixty years, it seems certain that the Cannon Haymarket will continue to thrive for the next sixty.

The Architecture

Both the interior and the exterior of the building incorporated mainly Italian and Spanish Renaissance styles, but the entrance foyer was inspired by Adams.

The ceiling is arranged in a symmetrical, sectional pattern extending right across to the arches above the stairwells. The background is coloured, with plasterwork relief picked out with white and gold. The original colour scheme was of pastel pinks and blues, but since the renovation in 1985, the patterns have been accentuated using bolder greens as a base.

The Cannon, Haymarket showing the films 'Stakeout' and 'Barfly' in 1988 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.The light fittings now to be seen are replicas of the original crystal chandeliers destroyed by the fire. The ornate balustrades to the right of the entrance have been replaced, although those on the left were virtually undamaged.

Left - The Cannon, Haymarket showing the films 'Stakeout' and 'Barfly' in 1988 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

The Paybox of the Carlton Theatre in 1928 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.Within the auditorium of Cinema One, it is possible to see the ceiling and light fittings much as they would have been seen in 1927. The ceiling was beamed to represent an Italian wooden roof, although in effect, each beam conceals a ventilator. The gilded frieze can be seen at the top of the side walls, extending behind the screen, indicating the situation of the stage.

Right - The Paybox of the Carlton Theatre in 1928 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

During the construction of the two smaller cinemas in the stalls area, some of the original finery was lost, including the Venetian-window style boxes on either side of the stage, although the oak panelling beneath the box on actors left can still be seen on the walls of Cinema Three exit...

The Carlton Theatre in 1927 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

Above - The Carlton Theatre in 1927 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

The Auditorium and Stage Right Box of the former Carlton Theatre in 1927. - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988. ...The exterior of the building is faced with Portland Stone, and although little has been altered, much of the decorative work is now obscured by an electric advertising sign.

The design was symmetrical, with at first floor level three central windows, each under small curved arches, with an additional window on either side surmounted by delicate 'swan-necked' stone work.

The Second floor windows were very small and plain, housing the projection box.

Left - The Auditorium and Stage Right Box of the former Carlton Theatre in 1927. The Boxes were removed when the Theatre was converted to a 3 screen Cinema in 1979 - Image from the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

The third level, which was originally comprised of offices used by the various craftsmen of the theatre (wardrobe, carpenters etc.) had the three central windows fronted by a small balcony, and circular windows on either side.

The front was topped with an intricately carved ledge just below the roof level.

The canopy was small, extending just out over the three sets of plate glass double doors. Legend has it that there was to have been no canopy, but Charlie Chaplin put up the money to build one to keep his fans dry whilst they were queuing to see his films!!...

The Foyer of the Carlton Theatre in 1928 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

Above - The Foyer of the Carlton Theatre in 1928 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

The Cinema's No.1 Auditorium situated in the Circle of the former Carlton Theatre in 1988 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

Above - The Cinema's No.1 Auditorium situated in the Circle of the former Carlton Theatre in 1988 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

A Frieze Detail in Cannon One, situated in the circle of the former Carlton Theatre - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988....In 1957, when Fox took over ownership of the theatre, the original designers, Verity and Beverly, were commissioned to design a new canopy and illuminated display for the front.

Right - A Frieze Detail in Cannon One, situated in the circle of the former Carlton Theatre - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

Foyer Ceiling Detail in the Cannon, Haymarket in 1988. The Foyer is still the same today as it was in 1927 when the Theatre was first built - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.The new canopy became the longest in the West End, and is reputed to be so still. The basis is still in use today, although somewhat updated.

Left - Foyer Ceiling Detail in the Cannon, Haymarket in 1988. The Foyer is still the same today as it was in 1927 when the Theatre was first built - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

The plate glass doors were also replaced at this time, and the centre set were later altered to form a kiosk open to the street. Despite these innovations it is not impossible to recognise the Carlton Theatre when you visit the Cannon Haymarket today.

The original Auditorium of the former Carlton Theatre - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

Above - The original Auditorium of the former Carlton Theatre - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

The View from the Screen of Cannon One in 1988, situated in the Circle of the Auditorium of the former Carlton Theatre - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

Above - The View from the Screen of Cannon One in 1988, situated in the Circle of the Auditorium of the former Carlton Theatre - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

The Projection Box

The Cinemeccanica Victoria 8 Projector at the Cannon, Haymarket in 1988 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.In 1979, when Classic became owners of the then Carlton, the most important part of the cinema, the projection box, was refitted.

2 Cinemeccanica Victoria 8 Projectors were installed, each capable of presenting 35mm optical stereo; 70mm stereo; 3D and 4 track or 6 track magnetic film.

Right - The Cinemeccanica Victoria 8 Projector at the Cannon, Haymarket in 1988 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

The 4 X 4 Tower in the projection box at the Cannon, Haymarket in 1988 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.The lamphouses are fitted with 4kw xenon lamps, but are capable of taking 6.5kw lamps, which are the second most powerful in the West End. The Lens to Screen distance is 78 feet.

Left - The 4 X 4 Tower in the projection box at the Cannon, Haymarket in 1988 - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

The Screen Ratios are: Scope; 70mm; 1.85; 1.75; 1.33;

Sound System - Dolby CP200 powered by 200wt channel amplifiers. The Carlton was the first West End Cinema to be fitted with Stereo Surround.

Cannon Haymarket Screen 2 in 1988, situated in the former Stalls of the Carlton Theatre - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.On 14th July 1925, at a meeting of London County Council, it was agreed that a certificate was to be granted, subject to conditions, in respect of new or reconstructed places of public entertainment, to the Carlton Theatre, 62-65 Haymarket (proposed to be erected) with the approximate capacity of 1,386.

Right - Cannon Haymarket Screen 2 in 1988, situated in the former Stalls of the Carlton Theatre - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

On 10th May 1927 it is recorded that:

We have informed the Lord Chamberlain that, in the opinion of the Council, the Carlton Theatre Haymarket would be suitable, subject to conditions, for use under an annual Stage play License.

Although no records are available as regards the specific conditions, by 1929 it was noted:

Report of The Theatres and Music Halls Committee 12th June 1929

Music And Dancing License Carlton Theatre 62-65 Haymarket

Cannon Haymarket Screen 3 in 1988, situated in the former Stalls of the Carlton Theatre - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.We are of the opinion that the above named premises are suitable for use under a music and dancing license and we have granted a cinematograph license in respect thereof, subject to appropriate conditions.

Left - Cannon Haymarket Screen 3 in 1988, situated in the former Stalls of the Carlton Theatre - From the souvenir brochure for the Theatre in 1988.

We have approved the drawings and, there being no opposition to the application, we recommend -

Mr J. Morley, General Manager, welcoming Her Royal Highness Princess Anne to the Royal Charity Premiere of Eleni, at the Cannon Haymarket on 25th September 1986.That a license for music and dancing be granted to the Carlton Theatre Company Ltd. in respect of the Carlton Theatre 62-65 Haymarket, until 31st December 1929 subject to the condition referred to in regulation 596 of the rules of management and the special conditions.

Right - Mr J. Morley, General Manager, welcoming Her Royal Highness Princess Anne to the Royal Charity Premiere of Eleni, at the Cannon Haymarket on 25th September 1986.

i) that no intoxicating drinks be sold or consumed on the premises except when they are in use solely for the performance of stage plays, and that notice be given forthwith in writing to the Council of any proposal to change the performance from music and dancing to stage plays or vice versa, and

ii) that persons awaiting admission to the premises be not allowed to congregate in any part of the premises until suitable arrangements have been made to the satisfaction of the council.

R. Smith Chairman.

A Paramount Pictures Advertisement for 'With Bird at the South Pole' - From the souvenir brochure for the Carlton Theatre in 1988.

Above - A Paramount Pictures Advertisement for 'With Bird at the South Pole' - From the souvenir brochure for the Carlton Theatre in 1988.

Advertisements for 'The Big Pond' and 'The Right to Love' at the Carlton Theatre - From the souvenir brochure for the Carlton Theatre in 1988.

Above - Advertisements for 'The Big Pond' and 'The Right to Love' at the Carlton Theatre - From the souvenir brochure for the Carlton Theatre in 1988.

An advertisement for 'Daddy Long Legs' at the Carlton, Haymarket - From the souvenir brochure for the Carlton Theatre in 1988.An advertisement for 'The King and I' at the Carlton, Haymarket - From the souvenir brochure for the Carlton Theatre in 1988.Compiled and written by Ms Lesley Tooze, BA (Hons), House Manager, Cannon Haymarket with the help of Ms Fiona Lilley, Assistant Manager.

Texts consulted include: The Theatres of London (Mander and Mitchenson); articles by Allen Eyles.

Grateful thanks are due to Rose Publicity Ltd for the funding of this brochure.

Right - An advertisement for 'The King and I' at the Carlton, Haymarket. And an advertisement for 'Daddy Long Legs' at the Carlton, Haymarket - From the souvenir brochure for the Carlton Theatre in 1988.

We also acknowledge the invaluable help and advice given by the Cinema Theatre Association, in particular for the items included in our display.

Other Acknowledgements:

The back of the souvenir brochure for the Carlton Theatre in 1988.Cannon CinemasHaymarket Advertising.
British Film Institute.
Greater London Record Office.
Mr J. Morley, General Manager Cannon Haymarket.
Mr C. Hatton, Chief Projectionist, Cannon Haymarket.
Mr B. Smith, Odeon Marble Arch.

And all those who so willingly gave their help and advice to make this year a success.

Most thanks must go to patrons, who, over the past 60 years, have not failed to support this cinema, and we hope will not fail to support us in the future.

Throughout the year we will be holding displays and charity events, and the Management and Staff of the Cannon Haymarket look forward to welcoming you.

The above text and images are from Cannon Cinemas' 'Sixty Glorious Years' Brochure celebrating 60 years of the Carlton Theatre, Haymarket, London, produced in 1988, and added to this site from an original copy in the Arthur Lloyd Archive in June 2013.

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