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The Olympia Theatre of Varieties, Bridgeton Cross, Glasgow

The Olympia Theatre - The Regeneration of the Olympia Theatre - Images of the Regeneration - The Olympia Theatre and its Founders by Graeme Smith - A Biography of William Bentley McMillan - A Biography of Andrew Lennox Deas - A Biography of Samuel Lloyd

Glasgow Index

The Olympia Theatre of Varieties, Glasgow with the jugler Walter Belloni on the Bill - Courtesy Graeme Smith

Above - The Olympia Theatre of Varieties, Glasgow with the jugler Walter Belloni on the Bill - Courtesy Graeme Smith

The Opening programme for the Olympia Theatre, Glasgow on September the 18th 1911 - Click to see entire programme.Situated on the corner of Orr Street at Bridgeton Cross the Olympia Theatre of Varieties opened in 1911 and was an impressive red sandstone building designed by the architect John Arthur and built in just six months by Messrs Thaw and Campbell. The Theatre's auditorium was designed in the French Renaissance style by the renowned Theatre architect Frank Matcham. There were two tiers of gallery and marble balustrades and the lush plasterwork which Matcham employed. It had a sliding roof to let air in and smoke out. The Theatre was built on part of the site of the former Smith's Rag Merchant store and an image from before and after the Theatre was built can be found here.

Right - The Opening programme for the Olympia Theatre, Glasgow on September the 18th 1911 - Click to see entire programme. On the Bill were The Eight Welsh Miners, The Gibhardt-Tegernseer Troup, May Poulton, Jack Hayton, Ferguson and Mack, The Waldrons, Ena Florence, Dottridge and Longden's Company in 'Ferdie's Ma-In-Law, and ? "Stuart".

The Glasgow Herald reported on the opening of the new Olympia Theatre in their 18th of September 1911 saying: - 'The Olympia, Bridgeton’s handsome new music hall, was opened last night under auspicious circumstances. The house was filled to overflowing at both performances and the scenes outside at Bridgeton Cross as the crowds surged to gain entrance were of a stirring nature. In the afternoon a large company of ladies and gentlemen assembled in the theatre for a private view. They were received by the directors and by Mr Samuel Lloyd the managing director. Provost McMillan, Greenock, who was introduced by Mr Lloyd, welcoming the company in the name of the directors and shareholders. It would be an endeavour of the management, he said, to bring to their theatre always something that would appeal to the better nature of the audiences. They considered that the building was an improvement on some of the music halls in the city, and they hoped that the programmes they would submit could compare favourably with the best. The majority of the work had been carried out by tradesmen having their places of business in the district, and the directors were highly pleased with the manner in which it had been executed. They had been fortuitous, he said , in securing the services of Mr Lloyd as managing director, and his past reputation as a caterer of amusements in Glasgow was a guarantee that good fare would be provided. On the invitation of the chairman the visitors walked through the theatre and inspected the various building equipment...

A Newspaper feature showing the Olympia Theatre, and inset its stage, in the Glasgow Herald of September 1911 - Courtesy Clyde Gateway.

Above - A Newspaper feature showing the Olympia Theatre, and inset its stage, in the Glasgow Herald of September 1911 - Courtesy Clyde Gateway. (This is the only known surviving photo of the stage and proscenium as designed by Frank Matcham)

The former Olympia Theatre after its refurbishment and conversion for other uses in 2012 - Courtesy Donna Robertson....The theatre buildings occupy a splendid site at Bridgeton Cross and presents an artistic exterior, the red sandstone surmounted by a balcony giving an appearance of stability. The interior is thoroughly up to date, and nothing that makes for the comfort of patrons has been overlooked. The decorative scheme of white and gold gives a charming effect, which is added to by some fine plaster work. From any part of the house a capital view of the stage is obtained. Waiting-rooms are provided for gallery, circle, stalls and pit and the refreshment department is ample.

Right - The former Olympia Theatre after its refurbishment and conversion for other uses in 2012 - Courtesy Donna Robertson. There are more photos of the regeneration of the building below.

Tip-up seats which may be booked, are provided in the pit at ordinary rates. The stage has been fitted up in the most approved fashion and the latest pattern of fireproof curtain has been introduced. The Olympia was completed within six months, which is considered a record in theatre construction. Messrs Thaw and Campbell were the builders.

The programme provided for the opening week is a capital one. There is an abundance of variety. One of the most pleasing items is that contributed by the Eight Welsh Miners. They are shown in the orthodox garb, with lamp and pickaxe, working at the “face” and wheeling their hutches. They are all talented vocalists and in concerted pieces as well as in solos they excelled last night. “The Soldier’s Chorus” was particularly effecting. In another line, but equally enjoyable, is the sketch entitles “Ferdie’s Ma-in-law” admirable played by Dottridge and Longden’s company. A henpecked husband is told by his son-in-law of a wonderful mixture which will freeze the person who comes under its influence. They plot to experiment on the mother-in-law, who overhears, finds an opportunity to substitute water for the potion, shams being frozen, and witnesses the carousal of her husband, who drinks and smokes to excess to compensate for long-enforced abstention. Laughter is loud and hearty for the audience when the poor man is disillusioned by his ‘thawed’ better-half. The Waldrons were warmly applauded for their comedy entertainment, and Ferguson and Mack, in the patter and knock-about business, were very diverting. A novel turn was provided by the Gibbardt-Tegernseer Troupe, who sang and danced in the picturesque fashion of the Alpine mountaineer. May Poultron. Ena Florence, “Stuart” and Jack Hayton helped to the success which was the feature of yesterday’s opening performance.'

The above text in quotes was first published in the Glasgow Herald, Tuesday 19th of September 1911 - Courtesy Simon Biggam, Arts and Heritage Co-ordinator, Olympia Theatre Project.

Some early artistes to perfrom at the Olympia Theatre were Reginald Jecks, aka The Ballad Monger, Marguerite Broadfoote, George Gray and Company, The Roland Brothers, The Six Rubies, Melt and Bray (Eccentric comedians), Arthur Hinton, King and King (Comedy duo), Amy Lloyd Earle, The Four Behans, Una Linley, Bert Lennard, The Harmonics, Harry and Ella (Comedy harmonising duo), and Miss Ronna Shanara's Troupe of Hybrid Mountain Goats!

After the Great War the Theatre changed to cine-variety and then to a full time Cinema from 1924.

An Olympia Theatre ground floor plan for when the cinema box was added in 1923 - Courtesy Clyde Gateway.

Above - An Olympia Theatre ground floor plan for when the cinema box was added in 1923 - Courtesy Clyde Gateway.

Matcham's original auditorium dissapeared when a modern auditorium was installed by ABC in 1934. There are some photos of the remains of the ABC auditorium here.

A regular visitor to the website, Donna Robertson, has sent in the following highlight of one of her visits to the Olympia in the 1950s, Donna says 'In 1958 on a Wednesday night I was in an almost empty Olympia in the stalls watching Ice Cold in Alex with John Mills and Sylvia Syms, but at the break before the big film began the interval seemed to go on forever, and the lights stayed up, next thing, rustling at the back, and two men in tuxedos marched down the sloping aisle. We all looked round to see this vision - Sylvia Syms dressed in a long ivory ball gown with a matching stole was coming down the aisle smiling and looking like an angel. It seems she had been on her way to the Cadora, an old plush restaurant in the heart of Glasgow, and saw or found out about the film being shown in Bridgeton, where she made her surprise appearance.

The Olympia Theatre looking very sorry for itself in 2010, still sporting a sign saying 'Full House Furnishings' - Courtesy Donna Robertson.Ill never forget it, she got up on the stage and talked about her new hubby and her life filming with John Mills, she was really lovely, and for a star like her to talk to a theatre only a third or quarter full was marvellous to a wee girl as I was back then, it made me night. I can neither find details or photos about this visit sadly.' - Donna Roberston 2011.

Right - The Olympia Theatre looking very sorry for itself in 2010, still sporting a sign saying 'Full House Furnishings' - Courtesy Donna Robertson.

In latter years the Olympia became a bingo hall, and after that the Theatre was used as a furniture shop until 1993 when it was abandoned altogether. Despite the Theatre being a Category B Listed building, it stood derelict for the next 18 years. The Theatre was also badly damaged by fire in 2004 and from then on its future looked very bleak indeed.

The Regeneration of the Glasgow Olympia Theatre 2011/ 2012

In June 2011 a major restructuring of the site which included the Olympia Theatre and Cinema was begun by Clyde Gateway as part of their regeneration project for Bridgeton. The Theatre itself was almost completely demolished, ironically on its hundredth anniversary, but the exterior facade was retained. Behind the familiar landmark £10 million was spent on an 18 month scheme to convert the building for the 21st Century. A public library and cafe were created on the ground floor of the new building, with archives on music hall, cinema, sport, and local history, centred on Glasgow. On the first floor a high performance centre was created, and the headquarters for the National Governing Body for Amateur Boxing. On the second and third floors 10,000 sq ft of commercial lettable office space was created.

The Olympia Theatre and surrounding area being prepared for regeneration in 2009 - Courtesy Donna Robertson.

Above - The Olympia Theatre and surrounding area being prepared for regeneration in 2009 - Courtesy Donna Robertson.

The auditorium of the Olympia Theatre, Glasgow just prior to its demolition in June 2011 - With kind permission The Glasga Keelies Website Funding of the scheme was achieved from various sources including Clyde Gateway, The Heritage Lottery Fund, Historic Scotland, Glasgow City Council’s Better Glasgow Fund, Scottish Government’s Town Centre Regeneration Fund, sportscotland, the Glasgow Trades House and the Hugh Fraser Foundation.

Left - The auditorium of the Olympia Theatre, Glasgow just prior to its demolition in June 2011 - With kind permission The Glasga Keelies Website

The restructuring of the Olympia Theatre and its conversion into the above mentioned scheme was mostly completed by the end of 2012. An excellent video showing the redevelopment and images of the former Olympia can be found here.

A Commemorative Coin which was given to all who were involved with the Olympia project, and those at the opening of the Mediatheque on the 15th of November 2012 - Courtesy Donna Robertson and Tam McCan. The ground floor of the new building which houses a large modern Library opened in December 2012 and is stated to have an extensive range of books, newspapers and magazines, it is also equipped with 32 computers for online learning, and has a community room and a children’s area. The boxing gym above was occupied by 'Amateur Boxing Scotland' in the early part of 2013, and office space on the top floors was then available for leasing. The official opening of the new Olympia was in February 2013.

Right - A Commemorative Coin which was given to all who were involved with the Olympia project, and those at the opening of the Mediatheque on the 15th of November 2012 - Courtesy Donna Robertson and Tam McCan.

There are many more photographs of the regeneration of the Theatre below.

A programme for the Olympia Theatre can be seen on the excellent Glasgow Story Website here, and there are some photos of the remains of the former ABC auditorium here.

Some of the above information was kindly sent in by Graeme Smith.

An Olympia postcard of 2012 showing the rebuilt venue - Courtesy Clyde Gateway.

Above - An Olympia postcard of 2012 showing the rebuilt venue - Courtesy Clyde Gateway.

The Glasgow Olympia Theatre and its Founders by Graeme Smith

The Remodelled Olympia Theatre in 2012 - Courtesy Clyde Gateway.The mighty Olympia at Bridgeton Cross was founded in 1911 by William Bentley McMillan who had been born in 1871 in Green Street, Calton in the city`s East End and later as a young man helped expand the billposting and advertising business started in Glasgow by his father, Matthew McMillan. W. B. McMillan was elected to Greenock Corporation in 1894, became a Baillie, and then Provost from 1909 to 1919. Under his civic leadership, many schemes of improvement in social and industrial conditions took place.

Right - The Remodelled Olympia Theatre in 2012 - Courtesy Clyde Gateway.

Advertising contractors gained from frequent advertising by places of amusement and, in Greenock, McMillan was active in many organisations including the Greenock Entertainments Syndicate which included the owner of the town`s Theatre Royal, publican J. F. Arthur. At least twice, around the start of the 20th century, the Syndicate tried to start new Variety Theatres. In 1899 McMillan was a director of a planned new public company to build the Greenock Empire Palace on a site owned by publican John McCormick and his brothers but the McCormicks later decided to build it themselves in 1903 and it provided drama and variety.

In 1900 a new permanent Circus Variety Theatre for the Syndicate, to replace their temporary building, was proposed very near the Royal in West Blackhall Street but it was a consortium led by R.C. Buchanan of Glasgow who was finally victorious over the site and built the substantial Alexandra Theatre in 1905, later known as the King`s. By this time the old Royal changed to being a variety Theatre, later becoming known as the Hippodrome, and McMillan as chairman of the Greenock Entertainments Syndicate connected it with the Pavilion Theatre, Glasgow for its management and artistes until new owners took over.

Despite these setbacks in his home town of Greenock McMillan decide to plan and build a major new Theatre in his native city, Glasgow.

For an architect he did not choose any of the firms connected with Greenock Theatres but chose John Arthur of Airdrie and Glasgow, continuing partner of the firm of George Arthur & Son. Arthur`s work to date did not include Theatres but McMillan would see every day for over three years how the impressive planning and rebuilding of Port Glasgow was taking shape in that town`s Bay area. The Port`s main shipbuilding family Lithgow had engaged, at their expense, John Arthur to carry out this work, and improve conditions for everyone. 400 houses were built for 2,000 people, complete with shop premises, two banks and a hotel, three public houses and a new Salvation Army Hall – and all finished in handsome red sandstone.

To progress the Olympia in 1911 McMillan joined with his fellow Theatre founder director Andrew Deas, of John Deas & Co, of the Atlas Foundry and Sydney Street engineering works, Glasgow, and formed a new public company with shareholders mainly in Glasgow and from all walks of life. This was the Glasgow Olympia Theatre of Varieties Ltd which continued to own the new Theatre until 1937.

In 1922 new directors were added, principally Harry McKelvie, head of the Princess`s Theatre, Main Street, Gorbals. In the next few years Harry McKelvie and his wife became the largest shareholders by far, followed by the W B McMillan Trust.

The above text on the Olympia Theatre Founders was written, and kindly sent in for inclusion on this site, by Graeme Smith in August 2013.

A Biography of William Bentley McMillan by Graeme Smith

Greenock Provost William Bentley McMillan - Courtesy Graeme Smith.William Bentley McMillan was born in 1871 at 83 Green Street, Calton, Glasgow, when his father Matthew was a printwork labourer (originally an iron turner) before becoming a bill poster and advertising contractor and moving to Greenock to take over the town`s billposting firm of the late Thomas North. More business was grown in Clydeside towns helped by his son, who became head of Matthew McMillan & Co in 1891 when his father passed on. In a few years time the business was the largest in west and central Scotland, its headquarters being in Greenock, where William married Margaret Campbell, daughter of a sugar porter, and they eventually lived at The Craigs, Newark Street.

Right - Greenock Provost William Bentley McMillan - Courtesy Graeme Smith.

A Greenock David Allen & Sons billposting advert 1911 - Courtesy Graeme Smith. In 1907 the firm was taken over by David Allen & Sons, of Scots Ulster origin based in Belfast and London, who were the largest advertising contractors in Britain and the largest theatrical printers in the world. They invited McMillan to be general manager for the UK but he declined, preferring to continue in Greenock, expanding David Allen further, to be the largest billposters and contractors in Scotland. W. B. McMillan became President of the UK Bill Posters` Association. The Allens were also major shareholders and owners of Theatres in Ireland and Britain.

Left - A Greenock David Allen & Sons billposting advert 1911 - Courtesy Graeme Smith.

For 27 years he was the chairman of Greenock Morton Football Club, and for a period the president of the Scottish Football League. In April 1922 Morton played for the first and only time in the Scottish Cup Final, at Hampden Park, and won by the only goal. Newspapers reported:- “The Scottish Cup was accepted on behalf of Morton and Greenock by Chairman W. B. McMillan and toasted with champagne borrowed from Queen`s Park. They had not dared to bring any in advance.” Two months later he died, age 50.

The above text on William Bentley McMillan was written, and kindly sent in for inclusion on this site, by Graeme Smith in August 2013.

A Biography of Andrew Lennox Deas by Graeme Smith

Andrew Deas was born in Glasgow in 1872, the son of a blacksmith. The family moved to Duke Street, Dennistoun where, after serving his apprenticeship, he became an engineer and head of his father`s firm John Deas & Co, smiths, engineers and ironfounders, of 61-67 Sydney Street, Gallowgate, Glasgow and of the Atlas Foundry, 28 Market Street, Glasgow. He was very active in the Trades House of Glasgow and was Deacon of the Incorporation of Wrights. He was President of the Scottish Engineers Association during the Great War 1914-18. When McMillan died in 1922 Andrew Deas succeeded him as chairman of the Olympia until his own passing in 1935.

The above text on Andrew Lennox Deas was written, and kindly sent in for inclusion on this site, by Graeme Smith in August 2013.

A Biography of Samuel Lloyd by Graeme Smith

Samuel Lloyd was the Olympia`s first managing director and had met W. B. McMillan some years earlier by assisting the running of Greenock `s Royal Theatre when it became a variety house. He was the son of Madame Lloyd whose Madame Lloyd Choir entertainments were well remembered across Scotland and England. His father, also Samuel, was a concert promoter and managed the professional ladies choir, but changed to Theatre management in the late 1890s in Eastbourne's Theatre Royal which he duly altered in character to be a variety theatre, later known as the Hippodrome. Soon after his father sold the Eastbourne Theatre Samuel Lloyd junior became manager of the recently opened Pavilion Theatre, Renfield Street, Glasgow from 1905 for some three or four years and then moved to Moss Empires` Coliseum Theatre in Eglinton Street.

From there he left to join the Olympia and was given a five year contract. However he left within the first year, presumably because of the very high losses that year, and moved instead to the newly opened Savoy Theatre in Hope Street. There he gained a reputation for full houses, and boasted to newspapers that he paid artistes higher than average wages, but seat income was not high enough and that Theatre soon became a cinema. He moved to London around 1914.

The above text on Samuel Lloyd was written, and kindly sent in for inclusion on this site, by Graeme Smith in August 2013.

Photographs of the Regeneration of the Olympia Theatre 2011 / 2012

There now follows some images of the regeneration of the former Olympia Theatre, kindly sent in by Glasgow Local, Donna Robertson, and some with the kind permission of the Glasga Keelies Website.

The Olympia Theatre being prepared for demolition in June 2011 - Courtesy Donna Robertson.

Above - The Olympia Theatre being prepared for demolition in June 2011 - Courtesy Donna Robertson.

Demolition of the interior of the Olympia Theatre begins in June 2011 - Courtesy Donna Robertson.

Above - Demolition of the interior of the Olympia Theatre begins in June 2011 - Courtesy Donna Robertson.

Demolition of the interior of the Olympia Theatre's auditorium in June 2011 - Courtesy Donna Robertson.

Above - Demolition of the interior of the Olympia Theatre's auditorium in June 2011 - Courtesy Donna Robertson.

Demolition of parts of the Olympia Theatre and shoring up of the exterior walls in June 2011 - Courtesy Donna Robertson.

Above - Demolition of parts of the Olympia Theatre and shoring up of the exterior walls in June 2011 - Courtesy Donna Robertson.

The Dome of the Olympia Theatre, Glasgow being removed for restoration in June 2011 - With kind permission The Glasga Keelies Website

Above - The Dome of the Olympia Theatre, Glasgow being removed for restoration in June 2011 - With kind permission The Glasga Keelies Website

The Dome of the Olympia Theatre, Glasgow being removed for restoration in June 2011 - With kind permission The Glasga Keelies Website

Above - The Dome of the Olympia Theatre, Glasgow being removed for restoration in June 2011 - With kind permission The Glasga Keelies Website

The Dome of the Olympia Theatre, Glasgow being removed for restoration in June 2011 - With kind permission The Glasga Keelies Website

Above - The Dome of the Olympia Theatre, Glasgow being removed for restoration in June 2011 - With kind permission The Glasga Keelies Website

The Dome of the Olympia Theatre, Glasgow being removed for restoration in June 2011 - With kind permission The Glasga Keelies Website

Above - The Dome of the Olympia Theatre, Glasgow being removed for restoration in June 2011 - With kind permission The Glasga Keelies Website

The Dome of the Glasgow Olympia Theatre is removed from the building for temporary storage before its eventual restoration and reinstatement - Courtesy Donna Robertson.

Above - The Dome of the Glasgow Olympia Theatre removed from the building for temporary storage before its eventual restoration and reinstatement - Courtesy Donna Robertson

The Dome of the Glasgow Olympia Theatre is removed from the building for temporary storage before its eventual restoration and reinstatement - Courtesy Donna Robertson

Above - The Dome of the Glasgow Olympia Theatre removed from the building for temporary storage before its eventual restoration and reinstatement - Courtesy Donna Robertson

The remains of the auditorium of the Glasgow Olympia Theatre during demolition in July 2011 - Courtesy Donna Robertson

Above - The remains of the auditorium of the Glasgow Olympia Theatre during demolition in July 2011 - Courtesy Donna Robertson

The remains of the auditorium of the Glasgow Olympia Theatre during demolition in July 2011 - Courtesy Donna Robertson

Above - The remains of the auditorium of the Glasgow Olympia Theatre during demolition in July 2011 - Courtesy Donna Robertson

Shoring up of the exterior walls of the Glasgow Olympia Theatre in July 2011 - Courtesy Donna Robertson.

Above - Shoring up of the exterior walls of the Glasgow Olympia Theatre in July 2011 - Courtesy Donna Robertson

The remains of the Glasgow Olympia Theatre in July 2011 with a hoarding displaying the building's future use - Courtesy Donna Robertson

Above - The remains of the Glasgow Olympia Theatre in July 2011 with a hoarding displaying the building's future use - Courtesy Donna Robertson

The remains of the Glasgow Olympia Theatre in July 2011 with a hoarding displaying the building's future use - Courtesy Donna Robertson

Above - The remains of the Glasgow Olympia Theatre in July 2011 with a hoarding displaying the building's future use - Courtesy Donna Robertson

The Glasgow Olympia Theatre during redevelopment of the building in February 2012 - Courtesy Donna Robertson

Above - The Glasgow Olympia Theatre during redevelopment of the building in February 2012 - Courtesy Donna Robertson

The Glasgow Olympia Theatre during redevelopment of the building in February 2012 - Courtesy Donna Robertson

Above - The Glasgow Olympia Theatre during redevelopment of the building in February 2012 - Courtesy Donna Robertson

The Glasgow Olympia Theatre during redevelopment of the building in February 2012 - Courtesy Donna Robertson

Above - The Glasgow Olympia Theatre during redevelopment of the building in February 2012 - Courtesy Donna Robertson

The refurbished Dome of the Glasgow Olympia Theatre being hoisted back into place on the redeveloped building on the 29th of February 2012  - Courtesy Ben Allison

Above - The refurbished Dome of the Glasgow Olympia Theatre being hoisted back into place on the redeveloped building on the 29th of February 2012 - Courtesy Ben Allison

The refurbished Dome of the Glasgow Olympia Theatre being hoisted back into place on the redeveloped building on the 29th of February 2012  - Courtesy Ben Allison

Above - The refurbished Dome of the Glasgow Olympia Theatre being hoisted back into place on the redeveloped building on the 29th of February 2012 - Courtesy Ben Allison

Onlookers watching the refurbished Dome of the Glasgow Olympia Theatre being hoisted back into place on the redeveloped building on the 29th of February 2012  - Courtesy Donna Robertson.

Above - Onlookers watching the refurbished Dome of the Glasgow Olympia Theatre being hoisted back into place on the redeveloped building on the 29th of February 2012 - Courtesy Donna Robertson.

The refurbished Dome of the Glasgow Olympia Theatre being hoisted back into place on the redeveloped building on the 29th of February 2012  - Courtesy Donna Robertson.

Above - The refurbished Dome of the Glasgow Olympia Theatre being hoisted back into place on the redeveloped building on the 29th of February 2012 - Courtesy Donna Robertson.

The Glasgow Olympia Theatre redevelopment nearing completion in June 2012 - Courtesy Donna Robertson

Above - The Glasgow Olympia Theatre redevelopment nearing completion in June 2012 - Courtesy Donna Robertson

The Glasgow Olympia Theatre redevelopment nearing completion in June 2012 - Courtesy Donna Robertson

Above - The Glasgow Olympia Theatre redevelopment nearing completion in June 2012 - Courtesy Donna Robertson

The Glasgow Olympia Theatre redevelopment sporting its new signage in October 2012 - Courtesy Donna Robertson

Above - The Glasgow Olympia Theatre redevelopment sporting its new signage in October 2012 - Courtesy Donna Robertson

The new Staircase which is situated under the Dome of the former Olympia Theatre in December 2012 - Courtesy Donna Robertson.

Above - The new Staircase which is situated under the Dome of the former Olympia Theatre in December 2012 - Courtesy Donna Robertson.

The new Boxing Gym which is situated on the first floor of the new Olympia building in a photograph taken in December 2012 - Courtesy Donna Robertson.

Above - The new Boxing Gym which is situated on the first floor of the new Olympia building in a photograph taken in December 2012 - Courtesy Donna Robertson.

Some of the office space which has been constructed in the new Olympia building in a photograph taken in December 2012 - Courtesy Donna Robertson.

Above - Some of the office space which has been constructed in the new Olympia building in a photograph taken in December 2012 - Courtesy Donna Robertson.