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The Gorleston Pavilion, Pier Gardens, Great Yarmouth, Norfolk

See also in this area - Great Yarmouth Theatres - Norwich Theatres

A Google StreetView Image of the Gorleston Pavilion - Click to Interact

Above - A Google StreetView Image of the Gorleston Pavilion - Click to Interact

 

A Poster for Arthur Lloyd presenting a Variety Entertainment featuring various acts, including his own son Harry King Lloyd, at the Gorleston Pavilion on July 15th 1901 - Click to Enlarge. The Gorleston Pavilion is situated on the East Coast near Great Yarmouth, Norfolk. The Theatre was built for the Great Yarmouth Council, opening in 1898, and it was designed by J. W. Cockrill who faced the building with Red Brick and added Terracotta Balustrades in the Italian Style. The Theatre's first Lessee was Keith Prowse, whose name continues today as the name behind the well known Theatre Ticket Agency, he ran Band Concerts there.

Arthur Lloyd and his son Harry King Lloyd both performed at the Pavilion when Arthur became manager and director of the Theatre for the 1901 summer season from May 11th to August 29th.

Right - A Poster for Arthur Lloyd presenting a Variety Entertainment featuring various acts, including his own son Harry King Lloyd, at the Gorleston Pavilion on July 15th 1901 - Click to Enlarge. More posters for Arthur Lloyd at the Gorleston Pavilion can be seen below.

The Pavilion was then taken over by George Gilbert for five years, Gilbert was already known locally as he was the Circus showman who built the Hippodrome at Yarmouth and also ran the Lowestoft Hippodrome. Gilbert used the Pavilion for showing early films.

During the First World War the Pavilion was occupied by the Army but afterwards in 1919 the Cinema Chain owner Frederick Cooper, took over the Theatre and added the ornate proscenium arch which can still be seen today. The Theatre also had a sliding roof at this time, which could be opened to ventilate the auditorium.

A Google StreetView Image of the auditorium of the Gorleston Pavilion. Click to see a 360 degree view of this and the Foyer of the Theatre in detail.

Above - A Google StreetView Image of the auditorium of the Gorleston Pavilion. Click to see a 360 degree view of this and the Foyer of the Theatre in detail.

During the period between the wars the Theatre was very successful and many of the famous names of the day appeared there. After the Second World War the Theatre was home to Concert Parties, put on by various managements and artistes, including, for many years, shows by Joe Collins, the father of Joan and Jackie, who was also an agent.

In 1962 the Concert Party shows were ended and the Pavilion became a Radio Studio for the BBC Light Program, producing well known Comedy shows on Sundays such as The Clithereoe Kid and Harry Worth.

The last Council run show at the Pavilion was in the 1980s and was put on by Dick Condon who was well known for his shows at the Theatre Royal, Norwich and other local venues. The Council had decided that they could no longer subsidise the Theatre and that looked to be the end of its history. However, local support proved to be its savior, and Carl Adams, who had made his professional debut at the Pavilion some years earlier, took over the running of the Theatre in 1984 and continued there for the next ten years. When Adams retired due to health reasons in the 1990s his partners Stuart Durrant and Kevin Lynch took over the running of the Theatre. They put on an array of amateur and professional productions throughout the year and continue to do so today. An obituary for Carl Adams from the Norwich Evening News can be read here.

Some of the above information was gleaned from an article by Tony Mallion on the Theatre's website.

The Theatres Trust says of the Gorleston Pavilion today:- 'The exterior promises more than the interior now delivers, but this is still an impressive late Victorian seaside pavilion. Red brick with single storey entrance block in front of a two storey concert hall with an advanced centre flanked by short towers with domes. Brick cornices, terra cotta balustrades and decorative panels, with much stained glass, all in an exuberant Art Nouveau manner. Unsympathetic modern entrance canopy. The flat-floored, relatively plain concert hall interior has a three- row end balcony and iron arched girders. The 1919 proscenium arch is decorated with nymphs and garlands. No flytower and limited wing space. This handsome building is in need of investment to reverse its decline.' - The Theatres Trust.

You may like to visit the Theatre's own Website here.

If you have any more information or images for this Theatre that you are willing to share please Contact me.

 

Arthur Lloyd's Gorleston Pavilion Posters

Click to EnlargeClick to EnlargeClick to EnlargeClick to EnlargeClick to EnlargeThese posters of Arthur Lloyd performing at the Gorleston Pavilion in 1901 are from a large collection of original Lloyd Posters collected since the mid 1800s by members of the family and found recently after being lost for 50 years. See the Poster Index here.

Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge

 

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