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Theatres and Halls on The Isle of Wight

Shanklin Theatre - Apollo Theatre - Trinity Theatre - Medina Theatre - Ryde Theatre - Theatre Royal - Memorial Hall - Esplanade Pavilion, Ryde - Ventnor Theatre - Summer Theatre, Shanklin - Winter Gardens, Ventnor - Sandown Pavilion Theatre - Grand Pavilion, Ventnor

The Shanklin Theatre, Prospect Road, Shanklin, Isle of Wight

Formerly - The Institute / New Town Hall Theatre

The Shanklin Theatre, Isle of Wight  - Courtesy Mike Crowe, Vic Farrow, and Anthony Wood

Above - The Shanklin Theatre, Isle of Wight - Courtesy Mike Crowe, Vic Farrow, and Anthony Wood

The Shanklin Theatre was originally built in 1879 as a grand classical building called 'The Institute, designed by E. G. Cooper with a pedimented Corinthian portico. The Institute opened in 1879 but in 1884 a Reading Room, which visitors would have to pay to use, and an Amusement Room, managed by the Shanklin Chess Club, with two Billiard Tables, were added to the building.

In 1913 the inscription that the building originally carried; the 'Institute and Reading Room' was removed under orders from the local Council, and the building became the Town Hall.

The Auditorium and Stage of the Shanklin Theatre as seen from the Stalls  - Courtesy Mike Crowe, Vic Farrow, and Anthony Wood.In 1925 the Institute part of the building was severely damaged by fire, although the Town Hall part survived, but it wasn't until 1932 that approval was finally given to reconstruct the building, which was to include a new Town Hall constructed beneath a new Theatre. Building work began in 1933 and the Town Hall and new Shanklin Theatre opened in 1934 at a final cost of £13,000.

Right - The Auditorium and Stage of the Shanklin Theatre as seen from the Stalls - Courtesy Mike Crowe, Vic Farrow, and Anthony Wood.

The Shanklin Theatre seated 700 people on its opening and during the war it was also used for dancing by removing the seats. The Town Hall was used for meetings and included a bar until 2005. And behind this was once a space used as wartime control rooms by the Civil Defence during the early part of the Cold War with the Eastern Block. There was also the Town's Mortuary included in the building which was accessible from outside only, this was later used by the BBC as a studio for Radio Solent.

The Auditorium and Stage of the Shanklin Theatre as seen from the Circle  - Courtesy Mike Crowe, Vic Farrow, and Anthony Wood.Following the war the Shanklin Theatre was really put on the map when Barry O'Brian's Company took over the running of the Theatre, putting on a variety of plays in Rep during the summer seasons. And on Sundays the Theatre was used for putting on Concerts which were shared with the Sandown Pavilion.

Left - The Auditorium and Stage of the Shanklin Theatre as seen from the Circle - Courtesy Mike Crowe, Vic Farrow, and Anthony Wood.

This involved two Companies with many famous names of the time who would swap between venues on the same evening so that both venues had the same production but in a different order. The performers were shuttled between the two venues by taxi. During the Winter months the Shanklin Theatre would be used by local Drama Groups such as the Unity Players and the Palmerston Players.

In the 1970s the Theatre was home to the Island Savoyards who were a local amateur group who put on Gilbert & Sulivan Operettas and other musical productions. The Savoyards still perform at the Shanklin Theatre today.

In 1992 a new Box Office was created in the former Reading Room in Steephill Road at the side of the Theatre, to replace the old Ticket Booth in the Foyer which has now been reused as a sweet kiosk.

The Auditorium of the Shanklin Theatre as seen from the Stage  - Courtesy Mike Crowe, Vic Farrow, and Anthony Wood.

Above - The Auditorium of the Shanklin Theatre as seen from the Stage - Courtesy Mike Crowe, Vic Farrow, and Anthony Wood.

In 2008 the Theatre was threatened with closure by the Isle of Wight Council who said that it was no longer financially viable. However, an enthusiastic group of locals soon rallied to the cause and set up a Trust called 'The Friends of Shanklin Theatre' to try and save the Theatre from closure. Happily, the Trust was successful and were handed the keys to the, by then, Grade II Listed building, by the Council in April 2010.

Since then the Theatre has had new computerised Box Office equipment installed and a new Matrix Seating System which has increased the capacity and enables the auditorium to have different arrangements to suit the varying productions.

The Shanklin Theatre, Isle of Wight at night  - Courtesy Mike Crowe, Vic Farrow, and Anthony Wood

Above - The Shanklin Theatre, Isle of Wight at night - Courtesy Mike Crowe, Vic Farrow, and Anthony Wood.

Today the Shanklin Theatre is open year round and stages all manner of productions including professional, amateur, and Children's Stage School shows, and is host to an annual Christmas Pantomime. Many famous names have appeared at the Theatre over the years including Norman Wisdom, Matt Monro, Arthur Askey, Charlie Chester, Alma Cogan, Anne Shelton, Jon Pertwee, Norman Vaughan, Felix Bowness, Dick Emery, Joan Regan, The Kaye Sisters, The Beverley Sisters, Semprini, Clinton Ford, Arthur Lowe, Jimmy Tarbuck, and more recently the Moscow Ballet, Al Murray, Chas and Dave, Showaddywaddy, Joe Brown, Gareth Gates, Jethro, Joe Longthorne, Rick Wakeman, Joe Pasquale, Acker Bilk and Jenny Éclair.

Handing over the keys to the Shanklin TheatreIn March 2013 the Shanklin Theatre and Community Trust finally had the Theatre signed over to them. Isle of Wight Council leader, Cllr David Pugh, and Island councillor for Shanklin, David Williams, presented the Theatre’s keys to Chris Quirk, the Trust’s chairman, and Anthony Wood, its secretary, on Tuesday the 12th of March 2013.

Right - Handing over the keys to the Shanklin Theatre.

The charitable trust, which paid more than £100,000 for the landmark, and which has run it as a community Theatre the past three years, have helped to turn the fortunes of the Theatre around. The trust, working alongside the Friends of Shanklin Theatre, has made significant improvements, including new seating, flooring, a bar and cafe. More than £180,000 has been spent on improving the fabric, safety, comfort and presentation of the Theatre, with further investment scheduled over the next five years. Mr Quirk said: "We are delighted to have finally achieved the transfer of the freehold back to Shanklin. It now gives the Theatre a secure future." - Text and Image Courtesy Anthony Wood.

You may like to visit the Theatre's own Website here.

Much of the above information on the Shanklin Theatre, and its accompanying images, was kindly sent in by Anthony Wood (Company Secretary of the Shanklin Theatre, in 2012). Images Courtesy Mike Crowe (Friends of Shanklin Theatre) and Vic Farrow (Theatre Bookings Manager).

The Apollo Theatre, Pyle Street, Newport, Isle of Wight

The Apollo Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

Above - The Apollo Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

The foyer of the Apollo Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust.The Apollo Theatre was created when the building, which was a former Methodist Church, was bought in 1970, and then converted by volunteers, under the direction of John Hancock, whose vision was to create a Theatre for Newport.

Right - The foyer of the Apollo Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust.

The Apollo Theatre is a member of the Little Theatres Guild of Great Britain (LTG). It's first production was in 1972 and it has been running ever since, putting on 7 shows every year including such diverse productions as Music Hall, Plays, Concerts, Christmas Shows, and productions by visiting local dramatists. The Theatre's website says that they 'try to include a whole range of theatrical styles and types of production, from Ibsen to farce, from Shakespeare to ‘Gypsy’ and everything in between.' The Theatre's Patrons include Prince Edward and Anthony Minghella.

The auditorium of the Apollo Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust.

Above - The auditorium of the Apollo Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust.

A Google Streetview image of the Apollo Theatre, Newport, Isle of Wight - Click to InteractThe Theatre has been much improved over the years and the purchase of the building next door has allowed them to add a Theatre Bar, and Rehearsal and Storage space. Its auditorium is small but comfortable and has seating which was originally installed in the Shanklin Cinema.

Right - A Google Streetview image of the Apollo Theatre, Newport, Isle of Wight - Click to Interact

You may like to visit the Theatre's own website here.

If you have any more information or images for this Theatre that you are willing to share please Contact me.

The Trinity Theatre, The Grove, Cowes, Isle of Wight

The Trinity Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

Above - The Trinity Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

The Stage of the Trinity Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust.The Trinity Theatre is in The Grove, Cowes, on the Isle of Wight, and is run by the Cowes Amateur Operatic and Dramatic Society which was Founded 1897 when the St Mary's Church set up a Restoration Fund to raise money for work to its foundations. A concert was held in the church and this proved so popular that the organisers decided to follow on with the staging of a musical play. And so began the Cowes Amateur Operatic Society whose first production under this name was a performance of 'The Mandarin' in 1898. The group is today known as CAODS.

Rght - The Stage of the Trinity Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust.

In 1983 CAODS purchased the Trinity Hall and this became their new permanent home. The Hall was converted into the Trinity Theatre and has had many improvements and modern facilities added over the years, and the group has staged all manner of productions at the Theatre including musicals, drama, farce, and an annual pantomime.

A full history of the Trinity Theatre was told in its Centenary Publication "One Hundred Years of the Cowes Amateur Operatic and Dramatic Society" by Declan Cleary. And there is also a History on the Theatre own website which you may like to visit here.

If you have any more information or images for this Theatre that you are willing to share please Contact me.

The auditorium and Stage of the Trinity Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust.

Above - The auditorium and Stage of the Trinity Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

The Medina Theatre, Fairlee Road, Newport, Isle of Wight

The Medina Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

Above - The Medina Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

The Medina Theatre is situated on Fairlee Road in Newport on the Isle of Wight and was built in 1976, in a similar style to the Sheffield Crucible, as part of the Medina College. The Theatre can accommodate 435 people and was originally used for school productions which included musicals and pantomimes etc, and for local meetings and the like. However today a more varied selection of productions is staged at the Theatre including concerts and comedy shows by well known artistes.

The stage and auditorium of the Madina Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

The auditorium of the Madina Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

The stage and auditorium of the Madina Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

The stage and auditorium of the Madina Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

Above - Four views of the stage and auditorium of the Madina Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

A Google Streetview image of the Medina Theatre, Newport, Isle of Wight - Click to InteractThe Theatre is today managed by the Culture and Leisure Services division of the Isle of Wight Council and also includes a Music Suite, Green Room, and rehearsal and practice room which double as dressing rooms during productions. There is also a bar and cafe adjacent to the Theatre which is shared with the Medina Leisure Centre where the main foyer for the Theatre is also situated. The Theatre is also equipped to show 35mm Films in Dolby Stereo.

Right - A Google Streetview image of the Medina Theatre, Newport, Isle of Wight - Click to Interact

You may like to visit the Theatre's own Website here.

If you have any more information or images for this Theatre that you are willing to share please Contact me.

Ryde Theatre, Lind Street, Ryde, Isle of Wight

Formerly - The Market House and Town Hall - Later - The Venue

The Ryde Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

Above - The Ryde Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

The original organ for the building housed in the Ryde Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres TrustThe foundation stone for the Ryde Theatre was originally laid in May 1830 and the building first opened as the Market House and Town Hall in 1831. The building was designed by the London architect James Sanderson with the Town Hall on the first floor and the Market Hall beneath.

Right - The original organ for the building housed in the Ryde Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

In 1866 the local architect Francis Newman reconstructed the building to make way for a larger hall on the ground floor, Newman also designed the clock tower at the same time, both completed in 1868.

Fire damaged the building in 1933 but it was refurbished to reopen the following year and it is this interior which still survives today as the Theatre's interior.

The auditorium and stage of the Ryde Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

Above - The auditorium and stage of the Ryde Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

The auditorium of the Ryde Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

Above - The auditorium of the Ryde Theatre, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

A Google Streetview image of the Ryde Theatre, Isle of Wight - Click to Interact.The Theatre was used as a music venue for a while, called 'The Venue', but was closed by the Council in April 2010 and still remains closed today.

In August 2017 The Theatre was still up for sale for offers in the region of £400,000.

Right - A Google Streetview image of the Ryde Theatre, Isle of Wight - Click to Interact.

If you have any more information or images for this Theatre that you are willing to share please Contact me.

 

The Theatre Royal, St. Thomas Square, Ryde, Isle of Wight

A lovely Tucks colour postcard depicting the Theatre Royal, Ryde.

Above - A lovely Tucks colour postcard depicting the Theatre Royal, Ryde. The caption says that the card is 'After the original painting by H. B. Wimbush.' And descriptive text reads: 'The Theatre Royal is one of the most historic houses in the South of England. Here Mrs. Jordan played for the last time in England and here Miss Ellen Terry made her debut as Puck in "A Midsummer Night's Dream." The church in the background is St. Thomas', built in 1719 and restored in 1827. It has a prominent spire and tower and contains a handsome marble tablet to the memory of its founder, Thomas Player.

The Theatre Royal in St. Thomas Square, Ryde, was built in 1871 and opened on Boxing Day night the 26th of December 1871 under the proprietorship of a Mr W. Brown. According to a report in the ERA of the 30th of July 1871 before the Theatre Royal was completed the Victoria Rooms nearby were transformed into a 'Bijou Theatre' and opened for a short season from Monday the 24th of July 1871 with a production by the London 'Little Nelly' Company under the direction of Virginia Blackwood.

The Theatre Royal itself opened on the 26th of December 1871 and is said to have had a beautiful ornate auditorium capable of seating some 1,000 people.

The Theatre was destroyed by fire on the night of Monday the 19th of May 1961 leaving only some of the external walls and the facade standing. And so it remained, in ruins, for many years until it was eventually demolished in 1981. The site is today occupied by a branch of the Nat West Bank (See below).

There is an early photograph of the Theatre here.

A Google Streetview image showing the site of the former Theatre Royal, Ryde, Isle of Wight, today - Click to Interact

Above - A Google Streetview image showing the site of the former Theatre Royal, Ryde, Isle of Wight, today - Click to Interact

If you have any more information or images for this Theatre that you are willing to share please Contact me.

The Memorial Hall, Avenue Road, Freshwater, Isle of Wight

The Memorial Hall, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

Above - The Memorial Hall, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

The Memorial Hall is situated on Avenue Road in the Freshwater district of the Isle of Wight and stages various Stage Productions, Film screenings, Exhibitions, Arts & Craft Fairs and Workshops and the like, and is home to its own Film Club. The building is also used by the local Council for their Planning Meetings.

The Auditorium and Stage of the Memorial Hall, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust. The Auditorium of the Memorial Hall, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust.

 

Above - The Auditorium and Stage of the Memorial Hall, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust.

A photograph of the Memorial Plaque to the officers and men of the Royal Field Artillery, 1st/5th Hants Howitzer Battery (Territorial Forces), at the Memorial Hall, Freshwater, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres TrustThe Memorial Hall was originally built as a Territorial Drill Hall and houses a Memorial plaque, unveiled in June 1923, to the officers and men of the Royal Field Artillery, 1st/5th Hants Howitzer Battery (Territorial Forces).

See details here.

Right - A photograph of the Memorial Plaque to the officers and men of the Royal Field Artillery, 1st/5th Hants Howitzer Battery (Territorial Forces), at the Memorial Hall, Freshwater, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust.

 A Google Streetview image of the Memorial Hall, Isle of Wight - Click to Interact.Left - A Google Streetview image of the Memorial Hall, Isle of Wight - Click to Interact.

You may like to visit the Memorial Hall's own Website here.

If you have any more information or images for this Theatre that you are willing to share please Contact me.

 

The Esplanade Pavilion, Ryde, Isle of Wight

A Google Streetview image of the Esplanade Pavilion, Ryde, Isle of Wight - Click to Interact

Above - A Google Streetview image of the Esplanade Pavilion, Ryde, Isle of Wight - Click to Interact

The Pavilion is situated on the Eastern Esplanade at Ryde on the Isle of Wight and was constructed from cast iron in a Chinese style by Walter MacFarlane of Glasgow in 1926. The Pavilion is interesting in that it is a copy of another Pavilion in Rothesay on the Isle of Bute which was constructed two years earlier. The Pavilion was built to stage Concerts and Summer Entertainments throughout the summer seasons and originally had a platform stage with a proscenium, which was added later, and after the fire at the Theatre Royal in 1961 it became Ryde's only Theatre for a while.

The Esplanade Pavilion Ryde Circa 1934 - Courtesy Gwen OSullivan

Above - The Esplanade Pavilion Ryde Circa 1934 - Courtesy Gwen OSullivan who says 'This family holiday photo was taken about 1934 with the Esplanade Pavilion in view. The photo is of my great-grandfather William David Neve (known as Bill) and his wife Eva.'

In 1991 it was proposed that the Pavilion was demolished but great local opposition eventually saved the building. A Bowling Alley was built on the seaward side of the Pavilion and the Pavilion itself was joined to this using the Bowling Alley as an entrance and refreshment area. All this enabled sufficient funds for the Pavilion's exterior to be restored and it is now a Grade II Listed building.

If you have any more information or images for this Theatre that you are willing to share please Contact me.

The Ventnor Theatre, Albert Street, Ventnor, Isle of Wight

Later - The Town Hall / Dance Hall / Nightclub

A Google Streetview image of the former Ventnor Theatre, Isle of Wight - Click to Interact

Above - A Google Streetview image of the former Ventnor Theatre, Isle of Wight - Click to Interact

The Ventnor Theatre was situated on Albert Street, Ventnor, on the Isle of Wight. It was constructed as a Theatre in 1877 by T. R. Saunders but would later be used as Ventnor's Town Hall before eventually being reinstated as a Theatre. In 1910 the Theatre's stage was 18 foot deep by 25 foot wide and the auditorium seating capacity was 450, although by 1972 this had been reduced to 351.

The closure of the local railway stations is said to have been the cause of the Theatre's demise, and in 1978 the Theatre was converted into a Dance Hall, and then later into a Nightclub.

In 1990 the Theatre was gutted and converted into flats although the shell of the building and its Grade II Listed Facade were retained.

If you have any more information or images for this Theatre that you are willing to share please Contact me.

Grand Pavilion, Esplanade, Ventnor, Isle of Wight

Later - The Gaiety / Summer Theatre / Casino & Hippodrome / Gaiety Amusement Arcade

A Google Streetview image of the former Grand Pavilion, Ventnor Esplanade, Isle of Wight - Click to Interact

Above - A Google Streetview image of the former Grand Pavilion, Ventnor Esplanade, Isle of Wight - Click to Interact

The Grand Pavilion on the Esplanade at Ventnor, Isle of Wight was constructed in 1896 as a home for Concerts and Entertainment during the summer seasons but was also used for dancing and skating, and during the first World War it was used as a space for assembling aircraft parts. The original entrance was through domed towers on the seaward side of the building and it also originally had a dome on top of the building but this was removed in 1986. The Pavilion was on one level with a platform stage of 13 foot wide by 19 foot deep and could be used as a Theatre although this declined after the war.

Today the Pavilion is used as an amusement arcade called Gaiety Amusements..

If you have any more information or images for this Theatre that you are willing to share please Contact me.

The Summer Theatre, Shanklin, Isle of Wight

Later - The Summer Arcade

A Google Streetview image of the former Summer Theatre, Shanklin, Isle of Wight

Above - A Google Streetview image of the former Summer Theatre, Shanklin, Isle of Wight - Click to Interact

The Summer Theatre was constructed on the Esplanade at Shanklin, Isle of Wight in 1921. It was actually a reconstruction of a former sea plane hanger from Bembridge and rebuilt on its new site by Messrs Simmonds. The interior was redesigned as a Concert Pavilion and had a platform stage and a proscenium and was very successful as a Theatre in the 1920s and 30s.

During the war the Theatre was used as storage for the Pluto project which was a pipe line under the sea, and was later badly damaged.

Today the former Summer Theatre is in use as an Amusement Arcade called the Summer Arcade.

If you have any more information or images for this Theatre that you are willing to share please Contact me.

Winter Gardens, Pier Street, Ventnor, Isle of Wight

The Winter Gardens, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

Above - The Winter Gardens, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

A lovely 1930s curved staircase at the Winter Gardens, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust The Winter Gardens on Pier Street, Ventnor was built by A. D. Clare in 1937 and replaced the earlier Winter Gardens on the same site which was demolished in 1935. When it first opened in 1937 the Winter Gardens had a large sun terrace on the roof but this has now gone. The ground floor was used as a Theatre and Concert Hall and was also converted into a Ballroom in the winter. There was a dressing room to the rear of the Theatre but the get in had to be done through the main entrance.

Right - A lovely 1930s curved staircase at the Winter Gardens, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

The Theatre was used until recently as a touring house for small shows and concerts but it was closed in 2011 and was subsequently sold to the developers The Hambrough Group.

A Google Streetview image of the Ventnor Winter Gardens - Click to Interact.A planning application to convert the former Winter Gardens into an Hotel and Restaurant by the new owners was approved in May 2012.

Left - A Google Streetview image of the Ventnor Winter Gardens - Click to Interact.

The plans included extensions of up to three stories to the side of the building for the construction of 37 bedrooms for the hotel. Due to ground movement however the former bar and foyer were said to need rebuilding before completion of the project but most of the rest of the building would remain.

The auditorium of the Winter Gardens, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust The stage of the Winter Gardens, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

 

Above - The auditorium and stage of the Winter Gardens, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

The Winter Gardens, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust The Winter Gardens, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

 

Above - The Winter Gardens, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

The auditorium and stage of the Winter Gardens, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

Above - The auditorium and stage of the Winter Gardens, Isle of Wight, in 2009 - Courtesy Mark Price - Theatres Trust

If you have any more information or images for this Theatre that you are willing to share please Contact me.

The Pavilion Theatre, Sandown Pier, Esplanade, Sandown, Isle of Wight

A Google Streetview image of the Sandown Pier - Click to Interact

Above - A Google Streetview image of the Sandown Pier - Click to Interact

A programme for the Pavilion, Sandown from August 1947 - Courtesy Roy Cross. The Pavilion Theatre was constructed by Mouchel & Partners Ltd on the landward end of the Sandown Pier in 1934. The auditorium which could originally accommodate some 675 people seated and 200 standing, was constructed on two levels, stalls and one balcony, reached from two wide staircases with its own foyer.

Right - A programme for the Pavilion, Sandown from August 1947 - Courtesy Roy Cross. The show was put on by Bernard Delfont and was called 'Summer Serenade'. The programme included images of Sonnie Willis, John Watts, Gordon Norville, and Blanche Coleman and her Ladies' Orchestra. See Inside the programme below.

In 1989 the seaward end of the Theatre was destroyed in a fire but luckily the stage and auditorium survived and the Theatre was refurbished, redecorated, and the backstage area was rebuilt with larger dressing rooms than previously.

Despite this however, the Theatre is now used as an amusement arcade.

If you have any more information or images for this Theatre that you are willing to share please Contact me.

Details from a programme for the Pavilion, Sandown from August 1947 - Courtesy Roy Cross.

Above - Details from a 'Summer Serenade' programme for the Pavilion, Sandown from August 1947 - Courtesy Roy Cross.

Some of the information on this page was gleaned from the website of the Theatre Trust.

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