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The Haymarket Music Hall, Beau Street, Liverpool

Liverpool Theatres Index

 

A Poster for the Haymarket Music Hall, Liverpool in 1895 - Courtesy Ian Cowell.The Haymarket Music Hall was situated on the south side of Beau Street, off Cazneau Street, in Liverpool, and was opened by William Kerr, under the management of W. Thomas, on Monday the 12th of February1883.

The Hall was on two levels with a Pit and Gallery, and had seating for some 2,500 people. It ran two performances a night, and in order to facilitate this exits were situated at the rear of the hall so that people could leave from one end whilst others could enter from the front.

Right - A Poster for the Haymarket Music Hall, Liverpool in 1895 - Courtesy Ian Cowell.

The ERA reported on the opening of the Haymarket Music Hall in their 17th of February 1883 edition saying:- 'This newly-erected hall was opened on Monday evening with a specially-organised company of artists gathered from various quarters of the United Kingdom, and the success attending the inauguration of the latest people's place of amusement in the city augurs well for its future success and popularity of the proprietary.

A Poster for the Haymarket Music Hall, Liverpool in 1896 - Courtesy Ian Cowell.The "Haymarket" is roomy, cheerful, and well built; and everything which care and foresight could do to secure comfort and convenience has been done by the proprietor (Mr Kerr), assisted by his manager (Mr Thomas). In his address to the public the former says:— "The Haymarket Music Hall has been specially designed for the purpose of giving two performances each evening: It is the intention of the management to have the place concluded in the most respectable manner possible, and also that it shall be one of the cleanest of the kind in the country. Especial attention has been given in the building of the hall to make the ventilation of the same complete, which facilitates the cleanliness of the place. Serious consequences having occurred from alarms of fire (too often false), it is particularly impressed upon the public that every available means have been taken for securing its safety. The stage has been divided front the audience by a water curtain, capable of being brought into play and deluging the stage, scenery, &c., in a few seconds. The hall is also fitted with large hose and hydrants."

Left - A Poster for the Haymarket Music Hall, Liverpool in 1896 - Courtesy Ian Cowell.

The arrangements for exits and entrances of the public have also been admirably arranged. The Haymarket has been specially designed for two performances each evening (at seven and nine o'clock), and, in order to secure the convenience of all who patronise the entertainment, the modes of entering and leaving the building have been so arranged that the audience vacating the first "house" does not in any way come in contact with those about to enter for the second.

The company engaged for the opening of the hall was thoroughly efficient and talented, comprising, as it did, the Fernandez trio, the wonderful flying trapezists; the Reynolds's, "Our American Cousins," Miss. Florence Merry, scrio-comic; Mr. Harry Cambridge, comic vocalist; Ridley and St. Clair, the musical clowns; Mr Gus. Gauntlett, acrobatic song and dance artist; and Mr Jean Clancy, American character comedian.'

The above text in quotes was first published in the ERA 17th of February 1883.

 

A Cutting from the ERA 17th of February 1883 on the opening of the Haymarket Music Hall, Liverpool

Above - A Cutting from the ERA 17th of February 1883 on the opening of the Haymarket Music Hall, Liverpool

When William Kerr left Alfred Farrell and Fred Willmot took over the running of the place until Wilmot eventually took over on his own. In 1906 Edwin W. Smith, who was previously running the Parthenon Music Hall, took over as Lessee and Manager.

What happened after this is unclear but the whole area was heavily bomb damaged in the war and then later altered in the 1970s so nothing remains of the site of the Hall today.

Archive newspaper reports on this page were collated and kindly sent in for inclusion by B.F. Some of this information was also gleaned from the books 'Annals of the Liverpool Stage' by R. J. Broadbent, 1908, and 'The Liverpool Stage by Harold Ackroyd, 1996.

If you have any more information or images for this Theatre that you are willing to share please Contact me.

 

You may find the following pages from this site of interest: