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Arthur Lloyd's 'I Vowed That I Never Would Leave Her'

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Arthur Lloyd's 'I Vowed That I Never Would Leave Her'

Above - Arthur Lloyd's 'I Vowed That I Never Would Leave Her'

Arthur Lloyd's 'I Vowed That I Never Would Leave Her' - Courtesy Colin McIntyre

Arthur Lloyd's 'I Vowed That I Never Would Leave Her' - Courtesy Colin McIntyre

Arthur Lloyd's 'I Vowed That I Never Would Leave Her' - Courtesy Colin McIntyre

Arthur Lloyd's 'I Vowed That I Never Would Leave Her' - Courtesy Colin McIntyre

Arthur Lloyd's 'I Vowed That I Never Would Leave Her' - Courtesy Colin McIntyre

Arthur Lloyd's 'I Vowed That I Never Would Leave Her' - Courtesy Colin McIntyre

Arthur Lloyd's 'I Vowed That I Never Would Leave Her' - Courtesy Colin McIntyre

Above - Arthur Lloyd's 'I Vowed That I Never Would Leave Her' - Courtesy Colin McIntyre

To see more Arthur Lloyd Song Sheets Click here

A visitor to the site, Aida Yared, whose website www.JoyceImages.com features the work of James Joyce's 'Ulysses', has informed me that the book contains references to the Arthur Lloyd song 'I Vow'd That I Never Would Leave Her'

Aida writes: 'One of the characters, Corny Kelleher, is humming "tooraloom" whenever he appears in the book. In the chapter Circe we get a few lines from his song "I vowed that I never would leave her, She turned out a cruel deceiver. With my tooraloom tooraloom tooraloom tooraloom." The source of the song had thus far eluded Joyce scholars.' Aida Yared.

I can confirm that Arthur's song and the song in 'Ulysses' are one and the same, see Lyrics below, and I have since discovered that Arthur Lloyd's 'Not for Joe'and 'Three Acres and a Cow' are also mentioned by name in 'Ulysses. (M .L.)

Lyrics of 'I Vowed That I Never Would Leave Her'

Please look on this warrior bold,
Pray behold, I've been sold,
And I'm sure when my story is told
Badly treated I've been you will say
By a girl who was called Susan Jane,
Susan Jane was her name
But I hope I'll ne'er see her again.

chorus:

Tho' I vow'd that I never would leave her,
She turn'd out a cruel deceiver,
Tootle tum, tootle tum, Tootle tum, tootle tum,
Tootle tum, tootle tum tay.

Now I met this girl first in the Park,
In the Park, What a lark,
And I ventur'd to make a remark
That it was a very cold day.
She answer'd me, not at all bold,
That it was very cold,
Her name and address she then told
Tootle tum, tootle tum tay.

chorus.

Lyrics and Song Sheet Courtesy Peter Charlton.

Since writing the above I have now been informed that Arthur Lloyd's song 'I Vowed That I Never Would Leave Her' was published in a book of George Christy's songs at an earlier date, 1862, with the name 'Bootle-Tum, Tootle-Tum Tay' so should be attributed to him originally. The book was called George Christy's 'Essence of Old Kentucky and contained many of his songs - The full text of the book can be found here and the lyrics of Christy's song are transcribed below.

BOOTLE-TUM, TOOTLE-TUM TAY.

As sung by the Christys.

I Will now then my troubles unfold,
You must know, I've been sold;
And I'm sure when my story I've told,
Badly treated I've been you will say,
By a cook who was called Sarah Jane,
Sarah Jane was her name;
But I hope I'll ne'er sea her again,
Rootle-tum, tootle-tum tay.

Chorus.

Tho' I vowed that I never would leave her,
She turned out a cruel deceiver.
Rootle-tum, tootle-tum, tootle-tum,
Rootle-tum, tootle-tum tay.

Now I met his cook first in the park,
Central Park, just near dark;
And I ventured to make a remark
That it was a very cool day;
She answered me not at all bold,
That it was very cold;
Her name and address she then told,
Rootle-tum, tootle-tum tay.

Tho' I vowed, etc.

Sarah Jane was a frisky young maid,
And good wages was paid.
And at the fine house where she staid
I called on her most every day.
But one evening she drove me quite mad,
Yes, quite mad, 'twas too bad,
A Dutch barber beside her she had,
Rootle-tum, tootle-tum tay.

Tho' I vowed, etc

"Mister Dutchman," says I, "this looks queer,
Swilling here, lager bier;
But you ain't got no biz'ness down here,
So listen to what I now say:
If I catch you here again, forsooth,
It's the truth, though uncouth,
I will darken your eyes, my sweet youth!"
Rootle-tum, tootle-tum tay.

Though I vowed, etc

"Now," said he, "vy to you interfere,
Mit us here, o'er our pier;
I've as much right as you to pe here,
Und I leave it to Sarar to say;
"Now, then, Miss, your affections I'll test—
Do not jest, I protest."
And the barber she vowed she loved best
Rootle-tum, tootle-tum tay.

Though I vowed, etc.

That she loved me I firmly believed,
But how soon was deceived;
Tho' it's no use me now being grieved,
For he married and took her away.
I wish him much joy of this belle,
What a sell, I must tell;
I hear that she lathers him well—
Lathers and bastes him each day!

Chorus,

Combs his head with a three-legged stool, sirs,
For making of me such a fool, sirs,
Rootle-tum, tootle-tum, tootle-tum,
Rootle-tum, tootle-tum tay!

From George Christy's 'Essence of Old Kentucky, 1862 - Full text here.

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